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Postby Polymath » Thu May 23, 2019 8:32 pm

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Subject title: Perspective (grids) for Fore- and Background

I want to make a picture with a person in the foreground, most likely with an upshot, you see him slightly from below.

And in the background I want to have a building. I think, this is not what I intended, the Building must be in an upshot now, too. So the Person most likely has to be close to the building for both to be on the picture.

So, how do I do the perspective grid for something very close to the camera (person) and far away from the camera (building) at the same time (also, so that I get the shot I intended, for example with the head of the person in the corner of the picture) ?

I did thumbnails, but how do I get the distance between person and building right, if everything is in perspective from below?

 

Postby Audiazif » Fri May 24, 2019 3:40 pm

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Polymath wrote:So, how do I do the perspective grid for something very close to the camera (person) and far away from the camera (building) at the same time (also, so that I get the shot I intended, for example with the head of the person in the corner of the picture) ?

I did thumbnails, but how do I get the distance between person and building right, if everything is in perspective from below?


The short answers would be you use the same grid for both and just wing it.

You use the same gird throughout the whole scene. If you were to use two different grids, the objects would not be in the same perspective. The only situation where you would use two different grids would be when you want the objects in different orientations from one another. However, the two grids would have to share the same station point and maybe some other information. I am not saying there is no solution to your second question but I think it would be much faster to just wing the distances. There is a point of diminishing returns on the amount of work you put into a drawing and what you get out. I mean you will spend a lot of time and effort on trying to get it "perfect" when you could simply wing it and get what you are looking for in a fraction of the time. There is a point where you have to decide whether it is worth the effort or not.
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Postby Polymath » Fri May 24, 2019 4:22 pm

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I just tested it very quickly, using the same grid is good, i figured, too.

I wanted the person in the foreground in an upshot, but the buildings in the background maybe from top, because they are not on the hill.
But I guess you can just ignore that and use the same grid anyways.
Just position the camera in the right place below the persons head.

I guess I have to find the camera angle I want through making rough sketches and adjusting.

perspTest.jpeg

 

Postby Audiazif » Fri May 24, 2019 6:17 pm

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The "camera" is what dictates the perspective. It doesn't matter what you put in the scene whether it is a person or not or if they are on a hill.

Polymath wrote:I wanted the person in the foreground in an upshot, but the buildings in the background maybe from top, because they are not on the hill.


This in not possible. If you have the "camera" in an up shot you you cant have something in a down shot. The only way you could have this is with curvilinear perspective.
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Postby Ambiguity » Fri May 24, 2019 11:43 pm

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You should figure out the scale first, both of these shots have the person basically as big as that house, which means he'd only fit in it if he was laying down.

I think you can actually get this simultaneous up shot/down shot thing if you get the character above the horizon line:
Image
A crop would have probably help the composition on what I did, but I didn't think of it til now.

In case you're not used to transfering scale, here is a video on it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItVBuB15ED8

 

Postby Polymath » Sat May 25, 2019 2:19 am

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Yes, through putting the camera under the head of the person (or like ambiguity said placing the person above the horizon)
you get an upshot for him like this -


perspTest2.jpeg


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